Big Bore CNC Lathes

Delivery of ideas and coverage of products and technology that promote the efficient production of quality, small turned parts is generally the heart and soul of the Production Machining brand. Treading applications for tubing can easily ft into this subject category, but even where not all criteria are met, a suitable story can often be found. In an industry as large and significant to the U.S. economy as energy, many shops can find applications that relate to their own experiences. So when Houston Treading LLC opens its doors to share its process of applying threads to pipes as long as 46 ft. and 9 5/8 inches in diameter, it is worth checking out. After all, the company faces many of the same challenges as the typical PM reader—delivery of material to the machines, gaging and quality control, budget constraints—even if quite possibly on a grander scale….
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Father & Sons Machine Precision in Santa Fe Springs, CA manufactures tire molds for one of it’s customers. The customer was expanding its tire sized and required a larger mold than Father & Sons could machine.

Joel Martiez, President, and his sons working for the company, decided to increase their machine turning capabilities. The largest lathe Father & Sons Machine Precision had was a 33-inch diameter by 120-inch between centers. To create future growth opportunities the decision was made to go beyond the requirements for this new tire mold and expand their machine turning capabilities…
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“More horsepower, more torque and more capacity was required to increase production requirements. Current machines, with seven horsepower, would no longer do the job needed,” said Moundville Metal Works President, Tony Redding. Moundville Metal Works, Inc., founded in Alabama in 1994, is a general machining company. Some of the components machined are plate rolls up to 27” O.D. and 120” long and all types of components for the roofing industry. The shop machines Hardox 400 abrasion resistant steel components for the mining industry. The materials used in machining include brass, stainless steel, 4140 steel, 4340 steel alloy, Hardox 400/450, blocks, plates and rolls. “After a thorough search we purchased two Ganesh machines from Metal Worx Machinery, a distributor for Ganesh Machinery. The machines purchased were the VFM 6237 machining center and the GTW-30 CNC lathe, heavy-duty machines with more torque and longer, larger travels than our present machines. Both of these machines have 30 HP spindle motors, meeting our need for more power,” said Redding….
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CNC Slant Bed Turning Center

A 1993 black GMC Typhoon SUV pulls to a stop at a signal. Seconds later, a sleek red Ferrari pulls alongside and stops, too. The driver in the Typhoon looks at the Ferrari driver, grins and stomps the gas pedal twice. Vroom! Vroom! It’s the signal he wants to street drag. The Ferrari driver laughs. “Yeah, right. You gotta be kidding,” he’s thinking. The signal light turns green. The two drivers punch their accelerators simultaneously. The Typhoon rockets away from the Ferrari, hitting 70 miles an hour in less than 2 seconds, leaving its opponent stunned.
“That scenario gets them every time,” says Mike Lee, the young founder-president of Chatsworth, CA’s Race Proven Motors, Inc. “The driver in the other car is astonished, of course, but what he doesn’t know is he’s just been beaten by an older GMC truck with a 1200-horsepower, turbo-charged Chevy V6 engine. It blows their minds.”…
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Tungsten Trim Works is celebrating 31 years of making bushings, sleeves, liners, balls and seats out of very hard alloys for a variety of industries. TTW (Tungsten Trim Works) has two manufacturing facilities lo-cated in Houston, Texas and Grants Pass, Oregon. They do machining, grinding, lapping, polishing, and both locations have their own foundries. Specializing in Cobalt Nickel based alloys, also known by the trademark names of Stellite or Stoody alloy TTW is one of only a handful of companies in the USA doing what they do. “Stellite is very hard and corrosion and wear re-sistant,” explains Ron Crume, owner and head of manufactur-ing at the Grants Pass facility. “The severe service valve industry is a huge market for us, and the alloy works well in those harsh conditions.” …
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Multi Axis Bar Machines

Advanced Designs is on an upswing because they always put their customers first. That’s why they are making capital investments that will strengthen their position for years to come. One of their recent investments really paid off. Advanced Designs was initially drawn to the Ganesh 32cs because of its versatility but they got much more than that. See how they are helping their customers grow and succeed in a competitive market with state-of-the-art machines.
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Alfonso Garcia was not easily swayed. After all, he had been with the company for 20 years—10 as company president—and he had become quite accustomed to the unpredictable nature of the business, the constant personnel changes and the struggle to meet customer deadlines. He couldn’t see how incorporating CNC could alleviate the burning issues, and he couldn’t justify the cost or the time it would take to bring one of these machines into the mix. In fact, the pressures of deadlines were so immense, he couldn’t take the time to consider the possibilities. Rite-On Screw Products Inc. (Irwindale, California) opened its doors in 1970 with two Brown & Sharpe 00G screw machines and two 2Gs. By 2005, it had amassed 18 Brown & Sharpes along with several Bridgeports and four Hardinge lathes for secondary operations. The shop was producing typical single-spindle work, mainly from brass and stainless, including parts for aerospace, medical, marine products and commercial appliance applications. The work continued to come in through the years,
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Willis CNC turned a potential disaster into a positive experience. By finding machines that suit the company’s jobs and its operators well, the staff worked through the fire’s ashes without losing any customers, and the experience strengthened the company….
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The human race seems to be psychologically designed to believe in inertia. When times are bad, they tend to believe those bad times will go on forever. When times are good, people tend to believe the good times will never end. But like the Chinese proverb says, “This, too, shall pass,” and the true test of character comes when decisions are made about how to handle those changes. “The recent recession tried really hard to take us out,” says Walt Owens, founder-president of Carson City, NV’s Owens Precision, Inc. turning-machining job shop, employing 65 people and occupying 47,000 sq. ft, in two buildings. “Before the downturn, we had been on a roll, buying equipment, hiring people, growing and making money. When the downturn hit, we were caught with a lot of machine payments, high payroll costs, and severely reduced revenues. The downturn really put our organization and team to the test.”…
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Today’s small shops are increasingly discovering the power of seven – That is 7 axis dual spindle CNC screw type turning machines. Such multi axis machines have always been associated with high volume work, and is usually priced out of the reach of the low to medium-volume ships. Because of time consuming setups, the machines weren’t cost effective for high-mix, low-volume work. But that seems to be changing thanks to factors such as the elimination of guid bushings and other efforts by OEMs to produce affordable multi-spindle machines.
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A Successful Machining Job Shop Harnesses the Power of a Ganesh Multiaxis Cyclone CNC Lathe to Cut Costs. Professionals often make tough jobs look easy, at least to an amateur. One reason is the pro’s experience. He knows what to do and how to do it. But an often overlooked reason is that the pro normally has the right tool in his toolbox for the job at hand. And, if on occasion he doesn’t, as soon as he finds the right one, he buys it. Such was the case at 26-year-old Alpha Omega Swiss (AOS), Inc., a Yorba Linda, CA job shop specializing in short-lead-time precision machining with a heavy emphasis on turning and swiss screw machining.
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Sixty Miles south of Silicon Valley sits the community of Hollister, CA. known worldwide for their criss-crossing earthquake faultiness and a “So Cal inspired clothing line for Dudes and Bettys” that actually has nothing to do with the city but use the name as their brand. It is also home to Conor Kelly, owner and president of Diablo Precision Inc. Conor embodies everything the Hollister brand represents, from the t-shirt and jeans to the Ironman inspired convertible. On the surface appears a man laid back and accepting, but deeper down is a perfection demon who feels the company’s sub 1500 DPPM could be better…
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How a Successful San Fernando Valley Job Shop Got Its Start as a Result of an Earthquake. For some people it takes a quick boot in the lower posterior, as they say, to get them up and moving. In the case of Brian Lawhead, president and owner of Chatsworth, CA’s Transco Engineering, all it took was the 1994 Northridge earthquake. “I was working at two jobs when the quake hit,” Lawhead says. “I was a contract coordinator for a defense company and, because of my father’s health, I was working part-time at his sheetmetal shop, Transco Engineering. I had been thinking about starting my own business for quite a while, but I hadn’t accumulated enough money to get going. As it turned out, the earthquake had a silver lining, at least for me.”…
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Smith’s Precision Machineworks was faced with the challenge to increase production, machine additional components for current customers and also to develop amore diversified customer base by acquiring new manufacturing technology. Multitasking machines and state-of-the-art-manufacturing software were carefully evaluated. After defining their manufacturing need, Smith’s Precision Machineworks selected the Ganesh Cyclone 32CS with a 4’ Edge servo bar feeder. The machine tool was purchased through Ganesh’s Alabama distributor, Metal Worx Machinery. Sid Rostami assisted Smith’s Precision with machine selection and installation. “We chose this machine because we have been very satisfied with our current Ganesh machining center.We also believe it will give us an advantage over our competition due in part to being able to complete a part in a single set-up,” said Kandi Smith, Managing Member of Smith’s Precision Machineworks. “In fact, on a recent manufactured part, the cycle time went from 10 minutes to four minutes, forty seconds and from three set-ups to one.”…
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Taking the correct steps to ensure sustained production improvement means looking for the ultimate in mill/turn technology involving multiple-axis capabilities. Fastener manufacturers are always on the lookout for cost reducing, productivity-enhancing solutions for their operations. A proper review of the key performance metrics often uncovers the economic utility of improved process benefits. Often it’s just a case of applying the right number of axes to the job at hand…
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A “B axis” is the common machining industry term for an articulating tool that is capable of moving in an arbitrary five-axis plane rather than being restricted to the traditional live tool motions found on a Swiss machine where a milling cutter can be positioned perpendicularly to either the diameter or the face of the part. The “B” refers to the letter address typically given to these axes on multitasking lathes capable of machining in five axes. The name “B-axis lathe” has become machining industry shorthand for describing lathes with programmable, articulating milling spindles…
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When Jerald Welch opened his shop in 2003, he didn’t realize such a large percentage of the parts he would soon be producing would be so highly regarded in the entertainment industry. He had grown up in the machining business, moving his way up through his father’s company that served the heavy trucking industry. But when his father decided to sell the business, Mr. Welch felt it was too big for his taste, so he set out on his own with co-worker (and now business partner) Kelly Flannery…
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After a machine setback in this shop, management got in touch with Ganesh Machinery Inc. (Chatsworth, California). This company offered a selection of machines that seemed to fit well with the needs of G&L, so the two companies worked out a deal on a multitask lathe with bar feeder—the model GH-25M. When a shop opens its doors for the first time, the owner typically has a pretty good business plan in place. However, life doesn’t always go according to plan. Often, surprising obstacles get thrown in the way, and creative solutions must be developed to overcome the challenges…
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Tyler Crouse, owner of Pro Precision in Phoenix, Arizona had an advantage over most other high school students of his day, as he had direction, and an idea of what he wanted to do for a living. As a drag racer and motorhead Tyler took every shop class the school offered, gaining skills that could help with his passion. His junior year saw him in advanced metal shop and presented him with an opportunity that shaped his career. “Advanced class meant we got to use hand lathes and mills instead of bench grinders and hammers,” jokes Crouse. “My first boss had the same shop teacher in high school as I did. He came in to class one day looking for a shop boy to work part time sweeping floors and pulling chips. I over-heard the conversation and volunteered…
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How One Job Shop Owner Learned to Enjoy the Trip Instead of Worrying about the Destination. Chino, CA’s Heather Screw Products Co., Inc. was founded in 1954 by Elmer and William Heather, grandfather and father respectively of Steve Heather, the company’s present owner-president. Like most shops, the company started small, grew and had some success. But also like most shops, the company had its ups and downs, too. “My grandfather and father were both working in machine shops back then,” Heather says. “I’m not sure what prompted them to do it, but they decided to go together and start their own business. They were both highly skilled cam screw machine operators and programmers, and somehow they managed to get a fifty-thousand part order from a lighting manufacturer. Back then that was a big order so they scrambled to get set up and fill it.” The scrambling meant the two Heathers had to find a machine to make the parts and a place to put it…
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Swiss-style CNC automatic lathes have long been synonymous with high-volume production of complex precision engineered parts, especially for the medical industry. Medical parts, both instruments and implants, that are machined on Swiss-style machines are long up 12–20″ (305–508 mm) and slender with a 12–15× length to diameter ratio (L:D) from bar 10 to 32-mm diameter. Parts of this type require support with a guide bushing along their entire machining length to allow removing a large amount of material in a single pass. Long slender parts typical of those for medical and even automotive applications account, however, for only about one-third of all the small complex parts that are available to be machined on CNC automatic lathes. The balance of these parts are short and can be machined closer to the headstock without either a guide bushing for support or ground or precision-drawn barstock needed with a guide bushing for consistent machining results. Most important, these small precision parts fit into the work envelope of CNC automatic lathes and benefit from the speedy cycle times, quality surface finishes and quick changeovers that are characteristic of Swiss machining technology…
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Turn-Mill Machines Turn a Shop’s Situation Around. It often takes seeing a machine in action to conjure up a solution to a shop’s problem. This was the case for Steve Walters, an engineer at TriContinent Scientific Inc. The company’s valve plug is machined on a seven-axis turn-mill machine, which uses 32-mm diameter bar, features a total of 27 tool stations, and is equipped with 5-hp (10-hp optional for main spindle) main and counter spindle motors, each with 6,000-rpm spindles. This plastic valve plug and valve body are two parts that TriContinent produces for liquid handling components for the life science industries using the Cyclone machines from Ganesh. The turn-mill machines have proven to save TriContinent money. The company is able to make 50,000 standard parts that it had been buying from another machine shop, saving about $3 per part and resulting in a quick return on investment for the machines.
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Turn-Mill Center Aids Shop through Recession
Multitasking is a skill that most shop managers wish they could improve upon, both personally and professionally. More work would be completed in a day if multitasking was easy. Bryan Cardon knew this was true when he chose multitasking as the solution to improve his shop’s workflow. He reduced cycle times and leadtimes for his customers in his Ogden, Utah, machine shop after implementing the Ganesh 32CS seven-axis, twin spindle, turn-mill center. The company also gained new customers and jobs because of this new machine and its capabilities. “We always look to technology and come up with other innovative ways to make products more efficiently,” says Mr. Cardon, general manager, Innovative Precision, LLC. “We do a lot of parts with multiple setups that require both turning and milling. We were spending a lot of time setting up various machine tools for all these operations.”
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Toolroom Division

Ganesh Machinery, Inc. has donated a GT-1640 lathe to Simi Valley Adult School & Career Institute for its machinist training program. The school was in need of current and relevant equipment, representative of what students could expect to find in the industry. “Machines in a classroom setting are used by students with limited knowledge and experience,” said Simi Valley Lead Instructor Oygar Lindskog. “As a result, the machines must also be able to stand up to rough usage.”
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A South African Shock Absorber Manufacturer Uses Ganesh Equipment to Help Overcome Obstacles in the U.S. Business World. Here’s the scenario. The year is 1990. Your brother is an off-road racing enthusiast. He invented better, tougher shock absorbers than the ones previously available for the sport. He formed a company, then sold it to another guy. Then he came to America, worked here for 18 months and returned to South Africa…
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Vertical Machining Center

One test of whether or not a company has lived right is to check its age and its attitudes. Companies, like people, go through various phases in their lives. In the beginning their owners struggle mightily to stay alive. Then at some point they have the systems, the people and the momentum to carry on without so much struggle. Some companies reach middle age and grow tired, usually because the owners are tired, and don’t have the energy to keep growing. At that point they often sell out, or they let their companies slowly wither and die. But it doesn’t have to be that way. Fullerton, CA’s Ejay’s Machine Company, Inc., a machining job shop serving the aerospace industry, is a perfect example that it doesn’t have to be that way. This 47-year-old aerospace company, with 30 employees working busily in a modern, 14,000-sq-ft facility still has the energy and vigor to compete and innovate against the best of them…
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“More horsepower, more torque and more capacity was required to increase production requirements. Current machines, with seven horsepower, would no longer do the job needed,” said Moundville Metal Works President, Tony Redding. Moundville Metal Works, Inc., founded in Alabama in 1994, is a general machining company. Some of the components machined are plate rolls up to 27” O.D. and 120” long and all types of components for the roofing industry. The shop machines Hardox 400 abrasion resistant steel components for the mining industry. The materials used in machining include brass, stainless steel, 4140 steel, 4340 steel alloy, Hardox 400/450, blocks, plates and rolls. “After a thorough search we purchased two Ganesh machines from Metal Worx Machinery, a distributor for Ganesh Machinery. The machines purchased were the VFM 6237 machining center and the GTW-30 CNC lathe, heavy-duty machines with more torque and longer, larger travels than our present machines. Both of these machines have 30 HP spindle motors, meeting our need for more power,” said Redding….
Read the story here >>

A 1993 black GMC Typhoon SUV pulls to a stop at a signal. Seconds later, a sleek red Ferrari pulls alongside and stops, too. The driver in the Typhoon looks at the Ferrari driver, grins and stomps the gas pedal twice. Vroom! Vroom! It’s the signal he wants to street drag. The Ferrari driver laughs. “Yeah, right. You gotta be kidding,” he’s thinking. The signal light turns green. The two drivers punch their accelerators simultaneously. The Typhoon rockets away from the Ferrari, hitting 70 miles an hour in less than 2 seconds, leaving its opponent stunned.
“That scenario gets them every time,” says Mike Lee, the young founder-president of Chatsworth, CA’s Race Proven Motors, Inc. “The driver in the other car is astonished, of course, but what he doesn’t know is he’s just been beaten by an older GMC truck with a 1200-horsepower, turbo-charged Chevy V6 engine. It blows their minds.”…
Read the story here >>

Tungsten Trim Works is celebrating 31 years of making bushings, sleeves, liners, balls and seats out of very hard alloys for a variety of industries. TTW (Tungsten Trim Works) has two manufacturing facilities lo-cated in Houston, Texas and Grants Pass, Oregon. They do machining, grinding, lapping, polishing, and both locations have their own foundries. Specializing in Cobalt Nickel based alloys, also known by the trademark names of Stellite or Stoody alloy TTW is one of only a handful of companies in the USA doing what they do. “Stellite is very hard and corrosion and wear re-sistant,” explains Ron Crume, owner and head of manufactur-ing at the Grants Pass facility. “The severe service valve industry is a huge market for us, and the alloy works well in those harsh conditions.” …
Read the story here >>

A Small Machining Job Shop Builds Parts to Keep America Safe.
The time was early July 2005. The jet lifted into the skies above Washington, D.C. Very soon afterward, the vice-president of San Jose, CA’s Tyco Electronics, Inc., just leaving a successful presentation at the Pentagon, punched in a phone number and placed a call to a small machining job shop in Watsonville, California. “PDM,” answered David Oldemeyer, founder-president of Precision Dynamic Machining, Inc. “David, get going. We need six prototypes and 10,000 units as soon as possible.” “You got it,” says Oldemeyer. He hung up, walked into his small shop and told his employees, “Okay, guys, Warlock Blue is a go. Time to make parts.”
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